Screening

screening

Cancer screenings are medical tests done when you’re healthy, with no signs of illness. They help find cancer early, when the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.
At SAMT we assist you to get access to the most modern technologies and equipment for the best possible result.
Find out what cancer screenings are right for you, based on age, gender and family history.

MEN

ages 40-49

Beginning at age 40, you should speak with your health care provider about the benefits and limitations of prostate screening. If you choose prostate cancer screening, you should get a digital rectal exam and PSA test every year beginning at age 45 to check for prostate cancer if you are African or have a family history (father, brother, son) of prostate cancer.

ages 50 and older

If you choose prostate cancer screening, you should get a digital rectal exam and PSA test every year to check for prostate cancer. Colonoscopy every 10 years or virtual colonoscopy every five years to check for colorectal cancer. If you’re age 76 to 85, your doctor can help you decide if you should continue screening.
Regardless of your age, practice awareness. This means you should be familiar with your body so that you will notice changes and report them to your doctor without delay.

Women

ages 21-29

• Clinical breast exam every one to three years to check for breast cancer
• Liquid-based Pap test every five years to check for cervical cancer.

ages 30-39

• Clinical breast exam every one to three years to check for breast cancer
• Liquid-based Pap test and HPV test every three years to check for cervical cancer and HPV.

ages 40-49

• Mammogram and clinical breast exam every year to check for breast cancer.
• Liquid-based Pap test and HPV test every three years to check for cervical cancer and HPV

ages 50 and older

• Mammogram and clinical breast exam every year to check for breast cancer
• Liquid-based Pap test and HPV tests every three years to check for cervical cancer and HPV.
• Starting at age 65, speak with your doctor about whether you should continue screening.
• Colonoscopy every 10 years or virtual colonoscopy every five years to check for colorectal cancer. • If you’re age 76 to 85, your doctor can help you decide if you should continue screening.

Lung Cancer Screening Exams

At this time, lung cancer screening is recommended only for adults at high risk. That’s because they have a higher chance of getting the disease. Being at high risk doesn’t mean you’ll definitely get lung cancer. But, you may need to start regular screening exams. So if you do get cancer, your doctor finds it at its earliest stage. When found early, the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.

You should get screened for lung cancer if you:
• Are a current smoker (or former smoker who quit in the past 15 years)
• Have a 30 pack-year smoking history (For example, one pack a day for 30 years or two packs a day for 15 years).

Along with regular exams, practice awareness. This means you should be familiar with your body. That way you’ll notice changes, like a cough that doesn’t go away or chest pain. Then, report them to your doctor without delay.